Extra £540,000 Committed To Battle Against Potholes

Extra £540,000 Committed To Battle Against Potholes

An additional £540,000 is being committed by West Sussex County Council to the battle against potholes – that’s enough funding for at least 2,000 extra, larger-scale, high-quality repairs. The council has already completed 11,000 pothole repairs to date this year and this funding boost is in addition to extra resources announced in May. This was when two roving “seek and fill” gangs and one dedicated to patching larger areas were added to the 15 teams already repairing potholes.

Bob Lanzer, County Council Cabinet Member for Highways and Infrastructure, said: “The extra £540,000 is great news and further proof of just how seriously we take the pothole problem in West Sussex and that we have listened to residents and how important they feel this issue is. West Sussex Highways, working with our contractor, Balfour Beatty Living Places, are working hard to tackle the problem and the total number of pothole enquiries we are receiving is already declining as we make progress in repairing the winter weather damage. Unfortunately, roads are not permanent structures, so they will never be totally pothole-free, but we’re winning this post-winter battle and the funding boost will be a big help.”

Jeremy Hunt, Cabinet Member for Finance, said: “With this extra £540,000 we will prioritise high-quality repairs to try to ensure we do not have to return to the same problems. It will support the extra work we are already doing and is a great example of the council listening and acting upon what our residents want. It is in addition to the extra resources, such as the roving ‘seek and fill’ teams, which are being funded from the £1,594,870 the County Council received from the Department for Transport’s Pothole Action Fund for this financial year.”

Some pothole facts:

  • The county council is responsible for maintaining around 2,500 miles of road.
  • In the first three months of the year, the frequent changes between freezing/cold temperatures, to mild/wet weather, and back again, increased the number of potholes on our roads. Unfortunately, roads are not permanent structures and deteriorate over time from constant use, the weight of vehicles using them and the effects of the weather. With the expansion and contraction caused by temperature change, deterioration will occur, resulting in new potholes.
  • Repairing defects, such as potholes, is done on a priority basis, dependent on size and depth.
  • The roads are inspected dependent on their hierarchy, with A and B classification ordinarily inspected on a monthly basis. C-class and main distributor roads on a three or six-monthly basis and declassified roads are typically inspected annually.
  • People can report concerns about potholes online using our Love West Sussex app.
  • While the county council is responsible for most roads in West Sussex, Highways England is responsible for, and maintains, the A27, A23 and M23.